sallyleebythesea
sallyleebythesea:

This wallpaper is so fun in this bathroom! #bathroom #wallpaper #lobster #sea #creatures #beach #coastal #decor #bathroom #decorating #fun #orange #blue #sink #furniture #interiordesign #design #nautical #tropical #lamp #website #advertising #bhg #life #sand #ocean



Awesome nautical wallpaper.  You all know my only complaint about it…

sallyleebythesea:

This wallpaper is so fun in this bathroom! #bathroom #wallpaper #lobster #sea #creatures #beach #coastal #decor #bathroom #decorating #fun #orange #blue #sink #furniture #interiordesign #design #nautical #tropical #lamp #website #advertising #bhg #life #sand #ocean

Awesome nautical wallpaper.  You all know my only complaint about it…

eighteenthcenturyfiction
eighteenthcenturyfiction:

"Lobsters," a broadside from around 1650, features an acrostic about this noble (and delicious) crustacean. I know this is a little early for the period covered by the journal, but I couldn’t resist posting this. And how did this slender, fragile piece of paper survive 350 years to end up in the McMaster University Library Archives anyway?
h/t @MarkMcDayter a prof at Western University, who pointed out on twitter that this broadside is “Surely a veiled political satire on Haselrig’s ‘lobsters’ and the Parliamentary army in general.”
Read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Depicting lobsters with the wrong number of legs is not only a modern problem.  Apparently, they have been incorrectly portrayed since at least 1650!  The lobster in the lower left may have the correct number of legs, but the rest are wrong.  

eighteenthcenturyfiction:

"Lobsters," a broadside from around 1650, features an acrostic about this noble (and delicious) crustacean. I know this is a little early for the period covered by the journal, but I couldn’t resist posting this. And how did this slender, fragile piece of paper survive 350 years to end up in the McMaster University Library Archives anyway?

h/t @MarkMcDayter a prof at Western University, who pointed out on twitter that this broadside is “Surely a veiled political satire on Haselrig’s ‘lobsters’ and the Parliamentary army in general.”

Read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Depicting lobsters with the wrong number of legs is not only a modern problem.  Apparently, they have been incorrectly portrayed since at least 1650!  The lobster in the lower left may have the correct number of legs, but the rest are wrong.